Extremely rare 'firework' jelly fish spotted near Mexico

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During a recent sea expedition near Mexico, researchers spotted a rare jellyfish off the Socorro Island, Mexico. The Halitrephes Maasi jellyfish is extremely rare and is one of a dozen to have been ever seen. This jellyfish looks like a 'firework' from is appearance.

Researchers onboard the Exploration Vessel Nautilus — a research vessel operated by the Ocean Exploration Trust — captured stunning photographs of this rare species, the Telegraph reported.

The Halitrephes Maasi jellyfish is a species of deep-sea jellyfish belonging to the family Halicreatidae. They are usually spotted at a depth of 4,000 to 5,000 feet under the water. However, this rare sighting of the jellyfish was barely at a depth of almost a mile — 1609 m — which in itself is a rare phenomenon.

The team of researchers at the exploration trust wrote that they started this year with deep sea fireworks stating that whenever they witness anything remarkable floating in the sea during their expeditions, they quickly document the discovery.

Speaking of the rare jellyfish, the team said that the frilled tentacles of the Halitrephes Maasi were discovered in the Revillagigedo Archipelago off the Mexican state of Baja California. The researchers said that the “radial canals that move nutrients through the jelly's bell form a starburst pattern that reflects the lights of ROV Hercules with bright splashes of yellow and pink.

They also shared a video of the rare species on their website.

The Ocean Exploration Trust was started by Dr. Robert Ballard in the year 2008. Dr. Ballard is infamous for discovering the wreckage of the Titanic.

Twitter users couldn’t control their excitement on learning about the extremely rare ‘firework’ jellyfish.

It’s amazing to have such spectacular color on a jellyfish, so far below the ocean, very cool,” a user named Thomas Otterman wrote on Twitter.

Beautiful! The incredible world beneath the ocean that humans have yet to explore-amazing isn't it? wrote Amrapali Choudhary.

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World's fifth largest diamond discovered in Lesotho

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This handout image received from Gem Diamonds via the Celicourt PR agency on January 15, 2018 shows a 910 carat diamond discovered at the Letseng mine in Lesotho. A diamond thought to be the fifth largest of gem quality ever found has been discovered in Lesotho, miner Gem Diamonds said on January 15, 2018 and could be worth as much as $40 million. The company unearthed the D-colour stone at the Letseng mine in the landlocked southern African country and described the 910-carat find as of "exceptional quality". A diamond thought to be the fifth largest of gem quality ever found has been discovered in Lesotho, miner Gem Diamonds said Monday, and could be worth as much as $40 million. The company unearthed the D-colour stone at the Letseng mine in the landlocked southern African country and described the 910-carat find as of "exceptional quality". Since Gem Diamonds acquired Letseng in 2006, the mine has produced some of the world's most remarkable diamonds, including the 603 carat Lesotho Promise," Gem Diamonds chief executive Clifford Elphick said in a statement. However, this exceptional top quality diamond is the largest to be mined to date. This is a landmark discovery. Ben Davis, a mining analyst at Liberum Capital, speculated in a research note to investors that the diamond could be worth as much as $40 million (33 million euros). Gem Diamonds shares in London were up 14 percent from the market open to £0. 92 a piece.
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Museums of unusual things around the world

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which opened in 2009, prepare to don scuba gear. For the less adventurous, there are also shallow areas for snorkeling and there is a provision for viewing through glass-bottom boats. Each of the life-size sculptures, by Jason deCaires Taylor, is made of pH-neutral clay to promote marine growth.

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Chinese 'rainbow dinosaur' had iridescent feathers

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There's not a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. There's an iridescent dinosaur.

Scientists on Monday announced the discovery of a crow-sized, bird-like dinosaur with colorful feathers from northeastern China that lived 161 million years ago during the Jurassic Period.

They named it Caihong, the Mandarin word for rainbow. Microscopic structures in the exquisitely preserved, nearly complete fossil unearthed in Hebei Province indicated that it boasted iridescent feathers, particularly on its head, neck and chest, with colors that shimmered and shifted in the light, like those of hummingbirds.

The discovery "suggests a more colorful Jurassic World than we previously imagined," said evolutionary biologist Chad Eliason of the Field Museum in Chicago, one of the researchers in the study published in the journal Nature Communications.

Using powerful microscopes, the scientists detected within the feathers the remnants of organelles called melanosomes responsible for pigmentation. Their shape determines the color. Caihong's feathers had pancake-shaped melanosomes similar to those of hummingbirds with iridescent feathers.

Much of its body had dark feathers, but ribbon-like iridescent feathers covered its head and neck. While it possessed many bird-like characteristics, the researchers doubted it could actually get airborne. Its plumage could have attracted mates while also providing insulation.

Caihong was a two-legged predator with a Velociraptor-like skull and sharp teeth, probably hunting small mammals and lizards. It had crests above its eyes that looked like bony eyebrows.

Many dinosaurs possessed feathers. Birds evolved from small feathered dinosaurs near the end of the Jurassic Period. Caihong had fuzzy feathers and pennaceous ones, those that look like writing quills. It is the earliest-known creature with asymmetrical feathers, a trait used by birds to steer when flying. Caihong's were on its tail, suggesting tail feathers, not arm feathers, were first utilized for aerodynamic locomotion.

It is extremely similar to some early birds such as Archaeopteryx," said paleontologist Xing Xu of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, referring to the earliest-known bird, which lived 150 million years ago. Its forelimbs were configured like wings. To be honest, I am not sure what function the feathers have, and I don't think that you can completely exclude the possibility that the feathers helped the animal to get in the air.

Asked what someone might say upon seeing Caihong, University of Texas paleontologist Julia Clarke said, "'Wow! And if they are anything like me, they might want one as a pet. Not suitable for children.

The dinosaur's full scientific name, Caihong juji, means "rainbow with a big crest.

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Enjoying the high life, up on the roof in Tel Aviv

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Ana Ashury, a mixed-media artist, stores away her artwork on her rooftop in Ramat Gan, a suburb of Tel Aviv, Israel, November 19, 2017. While she works as a video artist most of her time, Ana has recently started to use her rooftop work space as a workshop for collage creations.

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Le smartphone? France has another term in mind

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Even French President Emmanuel Macron checks his 'mobile multifonction'. Smartphones may have become ubiquitous in France, but the country's language mavens hope there's still time to keep the word from becoming ensconced in everyday speech. The Enrichment Commission for the French Language has come up with what it considers a more suitable expression: "le mobile multifonction", or the multifunction cellphone. It doesn't exactly trip off the tongue, but it fits with the commission's remit: Keep foreign words out of French. The ruling was published in France's official journal on Friday, meaning that government texts will have to use the new term. It annuls and replaces "terminal de poche", required -- in theory at least -- since 2009. A 'mobile multifonction' also comes in handy to take a selfie with the Eiffel Tower. The commission, which works hand in hand with the language guardians at the Academie Francaise, also advised "reseau dorsal" for backbone network and "fibronique" for fiber optics.
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